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Long term test = 36 mpg


mark3evo
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39 minutes ago, MikaS said:

Let me take that back  :blush:

Gen3 surely is faster on track, it has power on the right place and all the electronic aid.

This just shows how narrow minded i am, just thinking about the top speed stuff.

@MikaSdo you like this sort of racing 

 

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15 hours ago, mark3evo said:

do you like this sort of racing 

Why not, but not like they do it in US,

we had a roll race event here couple years back, it was pity i just had a injector problem in my bike and it was not competetive.

 

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15 minutes ago, MikaS said:

Why not, but not like they do it in US,

we had a roll race event here couple years back, it was pity i just had a injector problem in my bike and it was not competetive.

 

yes i would be better once rolling 

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  • 1 month later...
On 5/8/2022 at 10:15 AM, mark3evo said:

yes i would be better once rolling 

@madmattt@Busa Harbour man for the more thrifty busa owners :D

this US owner wrote this  bearing mind US mpg is WORSE than UK mpg

"Commuting about 40 miles on the freeway (Speeds between 70 and 85 Mph) and 20 miles in town (Speed limit) each way so 40/20 split I have been getting 49 MPG.

I can say the computer is very accurate as I have been testing it and comparing the MPG and the remaining range to what I have been putting in for gas. I ran it down to the bottom line on the gauge and refilled the tank. The computer said I had 30 miles left before I filled it and it took 4.55 gallons. That leaves about 3/4 gallon left in the tank so 30 miles is pretty darned close. The gauge was just beginning to touch the empty line so it will go a bit below that. When I fill the tank it says I have 246 miles of range which is pretty close to what I'm seeing. I am actually seeing better mileage than on my gen2 which is surprising.

Still get a bit nervous when in the red but now I know how far I can push it. I think on a long trip 200 miles will be about the fillup point depending on what's ahead.

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Or if you have @Busa Harbour man
in your rearview mirror it's a LOT less as I found out recently.
Although my cornering skills are no where near Ian's, it was fun to see his bike parked in my mirror at what seemed to be low lean angles :hyper:

Anyway, I think mine is down to 160 miles with the light on :shock:

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9 minutes ago, madmattt said:

Or if you have @Busa Harbour man
in your rearview mirror it's a LOT less as I found out recently.
Although my cornering skills are no where near Ian's, it was fun to see his bike parked in my mirror at what seemed to be low lean angles :hyper:

Anyway, I think mine is down to 160 miles with the light on :shock:

i have gone rusty on cornering especially when BHM is on your tail - i gave him more CAKE to slow him down :rolleyes:

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Yeah, I slipped up there, should've given him some 🍰

Although on my local road I'm pretty sure ......

No just me dreaming I was creating a gap :lol:

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When i had my Gen1 i use to love getting the bike over. But now i'm 10+ years older i'm injoying the views more so ride slower.

I also remember catching a old type ball cats eye with my exhaust on the vfr12 when it was not that old and H.onda wanted £1600 for a new one, which i did not buy. Was going way to fast for the bend, silly boy i was.

 

P3310001.JPG

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55 minutes ago, Martin said:

When i had my Gen1 i use to love getting the bike over. But now i'm 10+ years older i'm injoying the views more so ride slower.

I also remember catching a old type ball cats eye with my exhaust on the vfr12 when it was not that old and H.onda wanted £1600 for a new one, which i did not buy. Was going way to fast for the bend, silly boy i was.

 

P3310001.JPG

as you know if you follow the 'Vanishing Point'. method you can never go too fast into a corner again 

but of course you knew that - but here it is anyway

One of the keys to road riding is to read the vanishing point. This is the point at which you can no longer see the road. The closer the point is, the tighter the bend. The further away it is, the wider the corner is. Road signs and markings also give a good indication. Walls and hedgerows can give clues but don’t always follow the line of the road.

On a right hander, move to the left as far as it’s safe. Click down a gear or two. This gives some engine braking and provides instant acceleration as the corner opens out again.

On a left hander, move to the right side of the lane but do not cross the white line. If you do, you may not be able to avoid hitting that vehicle travelling towards you.

Click back a gear or two. This gives a small amount of engine braking without upsetting the bike and provides instant acceleration as the corner opens out.

Make sure you wait until the road opens up, not the point at which you are happy to speed up. You may be able to go faster on a bend you know, but you must still be able to stop in the distance you can see to be clear. The stopping distance will depend on you, your bike and the road conditions.

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